Nick Waldron Ltd.

Identity, print and digital design for a modern master craftsman.

Nick Waldron is an up and coming craftsman, based in the south east of England. Originally a one-man operation, in the last five years Nick has expanded his team into a handful of skilled carpenters. Focusing on distinctive work with wood, the company has already got a name for itself by producing everything from wooden caskets for the oldest and rarest Japanese whisky in the world, through to fully fitted private residences on Portobello Road. Nick and his team are steadily becoming the go-to workshop for discerning interior design firms and private clients alike.

Approach

All of Nick's clients have one thing in common: the highest expectations of quality craftsmanship. Whether they have a background in property development or as design professionals, this is a demographic that values a plain-spoken and dedicated approach, over and above some of the preoccupations of other luxury or local providers. It felt important to emphasise a sense of being well-established, and traditional, as well as exercising tasteful restraint. After all, we wanted to communicate that this is a workshop of professionals operating to a very high standard.

Result

I designed a strong yet simple word mark logo, to reflect the honesty and precision of Nick's business. Using the Gotham typeface, a modern and transparent feeling is portrayed. Mounted on a light shade of ivory, the wordmark also gives the sense of a traditional and established business. The brand was carried through to a small stationery selection printed on GF Smith paper and a responsive portfolio website built on Wordpress.

Visit: http://nickwaldron.co.uk/

The importance of print

Given the profile of Nick's clients and the prestige of printed communication in a predominantly digital age, we dedicated the utmost attention to detail for his stationery. Business cards were printed on 600gsm paper, featuring a debossed logo. The letterheads conformed to columns, allowing easy text and logo alignment, and the envelopes featured the word mark in a subtle hot-foil on reverse.